Indian Plains High School

Indian Prairie School District 204

Curriculum Overview

ENGLISH 1 - LITERATURE, LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

  • This course targets literary analysis through study of myth, short story, novel, poetry, and drama. Descriptive, expository, argumentative, and narrative writing, as well as basic research techniques and speaking skills are emphasized. In addition, students will refine grammar and usage skills through the writing process and effective composition strategies.

 

ENGLISH 2 – AMERICAN LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

  • This course includes the study of American Literature from colonial through contemporary periods using thematic strands. Students will read journals, biographies, essays, novels, short stories, plays, and poetry representing American authors and authors of various ethnic backgrounds. The literature will promote students’ analytical abilities and will encourage critical thinking through the writing of expository, argumentative, and narrative essays. In addition, the literature will service as models and material for speaking in persuasive, informative, and entertaining forums.

 

ENGLISH 3 – COMPARATIVE STUDIES AND COMPOSITION

  • This required course continues college preparation of language and composition through a skills-based study of a wide variety of texts representing multiple cultures and genres. Students will utilize skills to critically analyze information, synthesize valid sources, and develop cogent arguments while implementing 21st-century skills and technologies.

 

ENGLISH 4 – MEDIA COMMUNICATION AND COMPOSITION

  • This course focuses on various aspects of film study including the technical viewpoint, the historical significance, and the visual approaches used to demonstrate thematic ideas in film. The goal of this course is for students to become visually literate, critical thinkers, and evaluative writers when interpreting, evaluating, and analyzing film and media.  Students will focus on communication skills needed to effectively connect with others as well as on logically developing ideas with appropriate evidence, clear and precise language, and varied sentence structure.  To show mastery, students will respond through a variety of venues such as written analyses and class presentations.  This class will hone critical thinking and composition skills learned in previous English courses while instructing students on the concept of visual literacy.  This course is not NCAA core approved.

 

ENGLISH 4 – 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

  • This course allows seniors the opportunity to read a variety of contemporary novels, plays, and short stories. Building on textual knowledge, critical thinking, and composition skills developed in previous English classes, students will question and determine the role of contemporary literature in society through a variety of written analyses, class presentations, and quarterly projects. Novels read in this course contain mature content.

 

ENGLISH 4 – COMMUNICATION AND COMPOSITION

  • This course concentrates on communicating effectively in the academic environment, personal relation-ships, daily activities, and professional settings. Students will utilize and refine their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students will focus on logically developing ideas with appropriate evidence, clear and precise language, and varied sentence structure. They will learn how to effectively communicate in different settings through instruction on teamwork, problem solving, technological application, leadership skills, and interaction with people in various roles and work situations, all to help them become successful communicators in the world beyond high school.

WORLD GEOGRAPHY

  • The study of world geography provides students with a strong foundation for future social studies courses. Students will learn about the complex interrelation of physical, cultural, and economic geography. An emphasis is placed on the historical and political changes occurring within each region of study and the impact the geographic factors have on the day-to-day lives of people. Throughout the course, students will also analyze and develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of global issues: human rights, genocide, disease, overpopulation, resources, environmental dangers, world trade, emerging nationhood, and independence. The major world religions will also be studied. Students will develop critical thinking, reading, writing, and speaking skills. Regular homework reading beyond the textbook will be required. This course satisfies the freshman Social Studies graduation requirement.

 

UNITED STATES HISTORY

  • This course is a comprehensive study focusing on major themes and concepts essential to understanding American economic, political, and social institutions. Learning emphasizes analytical writing, interpreting historical documents, developing both written and oral communication skills, understanding cause and effect relationships, discovering the significance of people, places, and events impacting U.S. history, and applying historical principles in today’s world. This course satisfies the American History graduation requirement.

 

GOVERNMENT

  • Government introduces the student to the basic principles of political science. Emphasis is placed on students becoming part of an active citizenry. The semester course covers the foundations of government, the Constitution, political parties, campaigns, and the three branches of American Government. Group and individual projects are utilized. This course satisfies federal and state constitutional graduation requirements and satisfies the government graduation requirement.

MATH 200 (Placement required)

  • This course stresses the applications of skills developed in Math 100. Practical applications used in everyday life situations will be emphasized. This course will cover pre-Algebra and some basic Geometry skills. Note-taking and study skills will be stressed. A TI-30X calculator (or equivalent) is required. This course is not NCAA core approved.

 

MATH 300 (Placement required)

  • Emphasis in this course is on basic Algebra skills, including studying and graphing linear and quadratic equations, and further exploring Geometry concepts developed from Math 200. An integration of Algebra and Geometry will be covered. Note-taking and study skills will be stressed. A TI-30X (or equivalent) calculator is required. This course is not NCAA core approved.

 

ALGEBRA 1 (Placement required)  

  • This course is designed for those students who struggled in pre-Algebra and need more time to process and develop these skills. The course covers Algebra 1 topics including solving and graphing linear and quadratic equations and inequalities in one and two unknowns. There are activity-based units in this course. Note-taking and study skills are stressed and formalized. Students in this class, oftentimes are also scheduled in a math support course ACCESS MATH for an opportunity for pre-teaching, re-teaching, remediation, and reinforcement.  Students earn an elective credit for ACCESS MATH.

 

ALGEBRA 1

  • Algebra 1 is a one-year course that develops numerical and graphing systems. Solving and graphing linear and quadratic equations and inequalities in one and two unknowns and related polynomial functions are covered. Note-taking and study skills are stressed and formalized.

 

GEOMETRY

  • Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and geometric proofs through inductive and deductive reason-ing. The course includes topics such as geometry relative to the real number system, distance concepts, angles, triangles, geometric inequalities, parallel and perpendicular lines in space, planes, polygons, and circles. Right-triangle trigonometry is introduced. A graphing calculator, compass, and protractor are required.

 

GEOMETRY SURVEY (Placement required)

  • Geometry Survey covers all the basic geometry concepts, using problem-solving through inductive and deductive reasoning, but with little emphasis on formal proofs. The course includes topics such as distance concepts, angles, triangles, geometric inequalities, parallel and perpendicular lines and planes, polygons, circles, and spatial figures and their properties. Right-triangle trigonometry is introduced. A graphing calculator, compass, and protractor are required. Students in this class often are also scheduled in a math support course ACCESS MATH for an opportunity for pre-teaching, re-teaching, remediation, and reinforcement. Students earn an elective credit for ACCESS MATH.

 

ALGEBRA 2 (Placement required)

  • This course is devoted to providing an understanding of advanced algebra topics and expanding on the concepts of Algebra 1. A graphing calculator is required.  If a student intends to take Pre-Calculus the following year, Trigonometry during the summer is required.

LIFE SCIENCE

  • Life Science presents concepts in laboratory science that are built upon those studied in eighth grade general science. This science course is offered for those students who require additional support with math and reading skills. It is a course with a concentration in the areas of general plant and animal life, systems, structures and functions.  This course is not NCAA core approved.

 

BIOLOGY

  • This laboratory class is the traditional biology course. It is organized and conducted to provide students with a sound and comprehensive understanding of biology. Strong emphasis is given to understanding fundamental biological processes and how they apply to our lives.

 

CHEMISTRY/PHYSICS

  • This course provides students with a solid foundation of physical science and the laboratory techniques used to test and support such knowledge. One semester is an introduction to the principles of chemistry; the other is an introduction to the principles of physics

 

EARTH SCIENCE

  • This course represents an overview of the Earth. It engages each student in a laboratory study of topics in geology, including rocks and minerals, earthquakes and volcanoes, streams and glaciers. The topics of weather and climate are explored as well.

 

ASTRONOMY: EXPLORING THE UNIVERSE

  • This is an introductory course that focuses on observational astronomy. The planetarium may be used in order for students to comprehend observational techniques and coordinates that help them observe the heavens. Seasonal stars and constellations, their mythologies, and constellation creation are the main focuses of this class.

ESSENTIAL TECHNOLOGY

  • Students will expand their knowledge in basic technology and its application in academics and the work-force. This course will focus on developing twenty-first century technology skills by incorporating study in keyboarding, Internet research, and computer literacy. Through the use of integrated projects, Micro-soft Office, and various design programs, we will focus on building a student’s essential technology skills. Students who desire improvement in keyboarding and basic software application skills will benefit from this course and be better prepared for further study in the computer sequence.

 

CONSUMER ECONOMICS

  • Consumer Economics, a required course, will integrate economic concepts with consumer skills, a combination necessary for added satisfaction in the use of personal resources. Instruction will center on the student’s role in the economy as a citizen, consumer, and worker. Topics will include money management, buying goods and services, housing, banking and the Federal Reserve System, financial institutions and the use of credit and loans, consumer protection, insurance, savings and investing, pricing of products, supply and demand, taxation, government, and the free enterprise system.

US HISTORY THROUGH FILM

  • This course is divided into themes of study centered on the life in 20th century America.  Students will research topics to gather background information on the people, places, and events being depicted in the films viewed.  Students will draw on their knowledge of history and filmmaking to analyze and critique films and to determine their historical accuracy.

 

STREET LAW 1

  • Street Law will provide students with a practical understanding of law and the legal system. Through this class students will gain a better understanding of the roles that law, lawyers, law enforcement officers, and the legal system play in our society.

 

STREET LAW 2

  • Street Law II is open to students who have successfully completed Street Law I. Students' interests drive the curriculum selection for this semester course. Current areas of study are the death penalty, juvenile justice, and 1st Amendment rights.

 

GLOBAL TOPICS IN SCIENCE

  • In Global Topics the "big ideas" of science are stressed, such as the concept of an interacting system, the co-evolution of the atmosphere and life, the goal of a sustainable world, and the important role that individuals play in both impacting and protecting our vulnerable global environment.

 

COOPERATIVE WORK TRAINING

  • Cooperative work training was developed to provide eleventh and twelfth grade students with maturing experiences through employment that will help them become productive, responsible individuals. Students acquire knowledge of employment requirements, their social responsibilities, and the specific workplace skills. Goals are typically set cooperatively by the student, teacher, and employer (although students are not necessarily paid).

 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

  • This course will explore distinct areas of career exploration, exploring careers, finding a job, joining the workforce, professional development, life skills, money management, communication skills, interpersonal business relationships and behaviors, personal responsibility, and lifelong learning. Students will participate in a mock job fair to implement resume writing, interviewing skills, and professional attire.

 

CONNECTIONS:  MUSIC AND CULTURE TO 1970

  • This course emphasizes music's impact on American society. Students will examine the basic elements of psychology, sociology, and human social behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the history of rock and roll, the British invasion, Motown, and social protest music. Students will connect the psychological/ sociological structures of America with the influence popular music imposes on those structures.

 

CONNECTIONS:  MUSIC AND CULTURE FROM 1970

  • This course emphasizes music's impact on American society. Students will examine the basic elements of psychology, sociology, and human social behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the sounds of the 70's, the 80's and excess, alternative nation, and the many faces of hip hop. Throughout the semester, students will connect the psychological/sociological structures of America with the influence popular music imposes on those structures.

 

LIFE 101:  TAKING CARE OF YOURSELF AND YOUR DAILY LIFE

  • This class provides students with a practical understanding of the life skills necessary to achieve personal satisfaction through practical activities that encourage self-respect, responsibility, and attention to the details of living well. The class covers topics such as essential sewing skills, basic interior decorating, food and nutrition, fundamental cooking skills, building and maintaining relationships, and child care and development.

 

PERSONAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

  • This course is focused on individual and personal development and critical thinking skills while emphasizing strengthening self-esteem, recognizing and resisting negative peer pressure, and developing coping skills for dealing with changes within one’s self and within others. It teaches students the social skills needed for independent functioning within the community. Topics may include self-control, self-expression, obeying rules, decision-making, appropriate situational behavior, interacting with others, and maintaining relationships. The goal is for the student to develop independence, self-confidence, and self-reliance.

 

LIFE STRATEGIES

  • Self-Management courses introduce students to the skills and strategies helpful in becoming more focused, productive individuals. These courses typically emphasize goal-setting; decision-making; managing time, energy, and stress; and identifying alternatives and coping strategies. They may also allow students to explore various career and lifestyle choices.  Topics may include self-control, self-expression, obeying rules, decision making, appropriate situational behavior, interacting with others, and maintaining relationships.

 

ACCESS ACADEMICS

  • This study skills course prepares students for success in high school and/or for postsecondary education. Students taking this course need extra support to help them stay current in their other courses as well as reinforce skills and content from their other classes.  Course topics may vary according to the students involved, but typically include reading improvement skills, such as scanning, note-taking, and outlining; library and research skills; listening and note-taking; vocabulary skills; and test-taking skills. The courses may also include exercises designed to generate organized, logical thinking and writing.

 

ACCESS MATH

  • This math skills course prepares students for success in high school and/or for postsecondary education. Course topics may vary according to the students involved, but typically include remediating, pre-teaching and re-teaching math concepts required to be prepared and successful in the traditional Algebra and Geometry courses.  Students also work on listening, note-taking, vocabulary and test-taking skills. The courses may also include exercises designed to generate organized, logical thinking and writing.

 

ACCESS ENGLISH

  • This study skills course prepares students for success in high school and/or for postsecondary education. This course is intended for students who struggle in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and who may be taking more than pone English course in a semester.  A heavy focus is placed on the writing process with students being encouraged to refine writing products to their highest quality.  Course topics may vary according to the students involved, but typically include reading improvement skills, such as scanning, note-taking, and outlining; library and research skills; listening and note-taking; vocabulary skills; and test-taking skills. The courses may also include exercises designed to generate organized, logical thinking and writing.

 

BUSINESS ORIENTATION

  • This one-semester course introduces students to the world of business. Topics covered include types of business ownership, marketing, accounting, human resources, management, finance, ethics, and economics. These concepts are presented through classroom discussion and project-based learning. Students are encouraged to take this course prior to further study in business such as Management, Accounting, Marketing, and Advertising.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

  • Emphasis for this course is on physical fitness, fundamental skills and rules of each activity, and knowledge of the importance of fitness for life.

 

HEALTH EDUCATION

  • This course is incorporated into the Physical Education curriculum at the tenth-grade level. It includes the following areas of study: wellness, stress management male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology*, mental health human growth and development*, suicide prevention abstinence*, coping with loss birth control*, aging, death, and dying marriage and the family*, nutrition sexually transmitted diseases*, prevention and control of disease injury prevention and safety, prevention of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse. 
    *Parents may review course materials used in the instruction of these units and elect to have their child study alternative materials during the time allotted for a unit.

 

DRIVERS EDUCATION

  • The State of Illinois requires two phases of instruction to obtain a driver’s license. The classroom phase is required for graduation. Both phases may be taken from either the high school or an accredited driver education business. If a student attends an outside agency, the student must submit proof of classroom phase completion to the guidance office. The State also requires that a student pass a minimum of 8 classes in the two preceding semesters including middle school to take Driver Education. Students register for driver education and receive credit like any other subject. Students are scheduled by birthdate priority. A student is not guaranteed driving during the semester he or she takes the classroom phase of Drivers Education. Any student participating in the behind-the-wheel phase will need to provide the instructor with two checks: one payable to the Secretary of State for the driving permit, the second payable to School District 204 to help defray the expense of the driving phase, an optional service our district provides.
  • CLASSROOM PHASE The State of Illinois requires at least 30 hours of instruction if the student desires to obtain his/her legal driver license before 18 years of age. Classroom instruction is required for graduation and must be taken prior to or at the same time as the Behind-the-Wheel Phase.
  • BEHIND-THE-WHEEL PHASE Indian Plains High School does not offer Behind-the-Wheel training.  It may be taken at a student’s home high school or privately in order to complete the state requirement for their driver’s license.  This part of the program is voluntary. The State of Illinois requires this phase if students desire their license before they reach 18 years of age. At least six hours driving instruction and six hours of observation time is required. Course has a required fee.

Contact Us

Principal: Cecelia Tobin

1322 N. Eola Road (map)
Aurora, IL 60502

Main Office: 630.375.3375
Attendance: 630.375.3378

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